Johnstown Inclined Plane and Asiago’s Restaurant

A signature of Johnstown’s landscape for many years has been the Inclined Plane. Originally built for commuters after the 1889 flood, the world’s steepest vehicular incline still offers transportation to local residents, but now offers itself as a destination for visitors and locals alike. Whether you’re looking for a bit of history, a pleasant view or something to eat, a trip to the top of the Incline is a great way to spend part of your day in town.

Once arriving at the top of the Inclined Plane (not to skip over the actual ride, which is worth your $4 round trip itself), you can take a few steps over to the observation deck. Here, you’ll see the quintessential view of Johnstown, looking over the valley where the waters of the 1889 flood gushed through.

The Visitors Center, also located at the top of the Incline, provides a history lesson for visitors. Although even life-long residents may find a fact or two they didn’t know. The building also features a large window, from which you can view the inner workings of the Incline.

Just the past Visitors Center, sharing the same magnificent view over the city as the observation deck, is Asiago’s Tuscan Italian Restaurant (formerly City View Bar and Grill, which closed in 2013 after 8 years in business at that location; this post was updated in January 2014 to reflect this change).

If you prefer a more adventurous outing, why not try hiking to the top of the hill instead of riding? The 2.4 mile James Wolfe Sculpture trail winds up the side of the hill. Along the path, you can you view many works by James Wolfe, who created the pieces from steel from Johnstown’s Bethlehem Steel plant.

Note that the Inclined Plane operates on a seasonal schedule, closing occasionally during winter, and may have extended opening hours during summer special events. For directions to the bottom of the Johnstown Inclined Plane, click here. For directions to the top, click here. To learn more about the Incline’s current schedule, visit http://www.inclinedplane.org; more about Asiago’s Tuscan Italian is here: http://asiagostuscanitalian.com/.



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This entry was posted on Friday, January 20th, 2012 at 4:00 pm by ksekelsky and is filed under History & Landmarks, Nature & Outdoors, Sports & Leisure. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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